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Posts Tagged ‘Google’

What’s The Next BIG Thing

TheInternetOfThingsThe question, What’s the next big thing, is probably the question I’m asked the most, #2 is, how can I make money with an Open & Free Business Model. I’m only going to talk about the 1st question, what’s the next big thing?

For the most part the Internet has been a play thing, a really fun distraction right? Wrong, you’ve heard it before, the Internet is a game changer. So, what’s the next big thing? It’s called, ” Internet Of Things “. What that means is this, everything on the planet will be connected to the Internet and to you! The meshing of humans and the Internet, where everything will communicate to everything. In 15 years each person will be surrounded by 3 – 5 thousand connected everyday things.

IPv6 makes this all possible, IPv6 can give more IP addresses than there are atoms on the earth, which means, everything will have a unique identity. Which means, there will be a chip or sensor on everything, probably so small the naked eye won’t see it. Imagine a chair that has a sensor, it now has a unique identity, when you sit on it, it will know someone is sitting on it, and it will connect to your wireless / sensor device and it will know who is sitting on it. Because the Internet is connected to everything, this charge will collect everything about you, and it will then connect to almost everything in that room. The heat will automatically be adjusted to the way you like it, music will start playing based on the mood you’re in, and so on. This is an amazing thing, and yet….a nerving thing.

The Internet Of Things is all the data of everything on earth, BIG DATA, and it is what Google, FaceBook, Twitter, and all the other Social Networks are fighting for, and control of your data. We will see broadband speeds open up unlike we’ve ever seen, so the Internet of Things doesn’t experience choke points. The Internet will become three critical things, it will be the foundation of IOT (Internet Of Things):

1.) Communication Internet – we already do this on a low-level – it will be improved

2.) Energy Internet – distributed renewable energy

3.) Mobility / Logistics Internet – the delivery system

I’m not even scratching the surface, there is far too much for a single blog post. So if you’re wondering what the next big thing is, this is it, The Internet Of Things.

 

Do you prefer Blogs Or Social Networks?

Today I ask the question:

“Do you prefer comments on a Blog, or conversations on FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other Social Networks?”

I prefer Blogs, I like to keep the conversations here, not spread over multiple Social networks, at least here everything is self-contained. It’s easier to pull together smart thinking when all the comments and thinking are in one site when a question is posed. Now, having said that, you’ll notice this Blog doesn’t get many comments, maybe my content just isn’t interesting, or people just don’t agree and don’t take the time to let me know. It matters not, this is my space, it’s also a space for people who are interested, like-minded if you will, in my research, my point of view, my perspective, my foresight…it gets cataloged here on this Blog.

Now, I can’t control where you want to talk about my ideas, my blog posts, I just go where you are….when I have the time. The easiest way to get my writing…sign-up for my updates, then it hits the Inbox, that’s where we can have real in-depth conversations.

I understand it’s easier to comment on a Social Network, I publish to Social Networks with the hopes you will come here, at least then you might look around, read more and get exposed to more of my ideas and thoughts.

So if you aren’t commenting here, you may have already answered my question, or maybe…you never thought about it before. Never the less, feel free to comment here, I would love to get your view on the topic.

Do you prefer Blogs Or Social Networks?

My Predictions On Blogging 5 Years Ago – Was I Wrong?

Five years ago, March 1st, 2010, I wrote about what Blogs might look like in 5 years, I also threw out some numbers that I predicted would happen. Let’s go back and see how close I was back then.

Here is my opening paragraph:

“I can’t help but wonder what blogging will look like in 5 years, blogs for the most part are static and becoming integrated with Social Media Tools. There’s only 1.7 Billion people on the net and over 235 Million Blogs out there. Projections clearly show that over the next 3 – 5 years 5 Billion people will be on the Internet. Will Blogging be the primary platform? I don’t think so, everything is going more and more mobile, on the go.”

At that time only 1.7 Billion people were using the Internet. There were ONLY 235 Million Blogs, and data also suggested that in the next 3 -5 years there would be 5 Billion people using the Internet.

Today, over 3 Billion people are using the Internet, that’s 2 Billion short of projections, but that’s mostly due to the speed in which Internet access could be provided. Google & 3BNetworks are making the Internet available to all the 3rd world countries, but not as quickly as they had hoped.

The number of blogs on the Internet today is, well….seemingly impossible to track, there is no accurate count that I’m aware of.

Let’s look at paragraph #2:

“Will there be a place for blogs? Will there be a need to for content to be new and fresh multiple times a day? The money won’t be the content, it will be in the filtering and curation of content produced. More products or systems will be invented to manage all this data, data will be connected to data, there will be a huge need for filtering.”

There was a time, recently…that blogging was considered dead. But ask the question, will there be a place for blogs? Obviously blogging is not dead, and there is still a place & need for blogging. The money in blogging is actually the content, original content…there is bigger money in the curation, and the delivering of that filtering and curating. It’s kind of like the retail market, the channel of distribution, more information, curated, and lower prices. Whoever has curated a large amount of data, and has figured out how to deliver it to the masses at a low price, and even free, is making large piles of money. Not much has changed here, the old way, or the old attitude still prevails here, in terms of how we think about business, and how it is being done. One thing still rings true, it’s impossible to read every blog on the Internet, so those who filter and curate have a leg up.

And the last paragraph:

“There is much to do, and it will be interesting to see how things scale as the rise in Internet users climbs to 5 Billion. How will it impact your business? How will it impact your blog? How will we rise above the noise we can’t rise above now? The answers are forth coming, but we haven’t figured them out yet. We better hurry, time is running short. Will this blog even show up on the radar screen, it barely does now! So many questions and so many unanswered. We spend hours a day working on our blogs thinking it will look and feel the same years down the road. But I can help but wonder, what will blogs look like in 5 years?”

All these questions are still valid today, why? It boils down to one thing….we still haven’t made the paradigm shift. We are still hanging on to the old ways of doing business, organizing business, and we are still trying force feed an Industrial Age to the masses. We just can’t seem to embrace the change required, it’s too hard I guess.

In some circles, change is happening just for the sake of change, and in others, it’s moving to fast to accept as a new way of life. No matter how difficult it might be to make this paradigm shift, the blog doesn’t appear to be going away, everything is just more mobile. Mobility is here to stay, and is also changing, technology is being embedded into everything these days, including our clothes.

So, was I wrong? Sure, but not because I should have been, I was wrong because most of what I saw, and see today, is just taking longer, but it’s still going to happen. Is blogging dead, not by a long shot…you’re reading it now : ) And yes, there is still much to be done. To be honest, I’m disappointed in where blogging is today, but that to is changing. I am concerned as well, technology is fooling us, we are allowing it to control our lives. Texting and driving is all the proof I need.

The Future Of Business – The Resume Part 2

I happen to be married to an HR Manager who disagree’s with my earlier post, she claims that resume’s, traditional resume’s are the only way to hire in certain industries, I disagree of course : ) Her argument is for those who are labor workers, those who drive forklifts, work in warehouses, drive pallet jacks, stock shelves and so on. If you believe resume’s are the only way, then you’re right.

Let’s talk about this traditional way for a moment. I’m going to do a very high-level view here, not much detail, but you’ll get the idea I hope.Let’s use a warehouse job scenario. Someone submits a résumé to your HR office, it goes in a pile for review, you’re holding job fairs (that cost money), you have a staff person give the résumé’s a once over, and those resume’s are short listed. Once you’ve decided who is on the short list, you call them in for an interview. Keep in mind, you know nothing about the candidate, other than what’s on the resume. You then arrange an interview, if the candidate is a good candidate, by whatever measurement you’re using, you go to the next step. Yes or No, are you going to go further with the candidates after the first interview.

Typically, once you’ve decided to offer a person a job, whatever it might be, you do a background check on them, you are now going deeper on your financial commitment. On average, once you’ve decided to hire a full-time employee, it costs your organization around $10,000, and they haven’t worked a minute, you just hired them. And you still know very little about the person you just hired, you still don’t know if they can meet the job description, and or physically do the work. Sure you have 90 days to decide if they are a good fit and will keep them on, but you’ve just spent good money after bad.

I would recommend to the warehouse to set up a website that runs candidates through a serious of questionnaires and tests. This site does low-level training while they are applying, for the purposes of knowing more about a candidate long before they even get an interview. Yes, there is an investment in building the online tools, but it’s a one time investment, you’re not paying or investing large amounts of time and money.

By directing job seekers to your website, you save your HR staff time, and you don’t waste time interviewing poor candidates. Aptitude testing, job related testing, and how to do certain job activities online can tell much more about someone than a piece of paper ever will.

If we are going to change the way we do our work, we must change the way we look and think about the work we do. It’s a paradigm shift, it’s not easy, but if you’re willing, you will be seen as a problem solver that saves time and money.

 

The Future Of Business – The Resume

Why are we still submitting resume’s? Why do we continue to use them? They’re not useful, not in the way they need to be, so why do we keep using a tool that doesn’t work very well? Most resume’s never see the light of day, in fact, the only time they get looked at, is if there is an immediate need. What’s the first thing you look at when you have a résumé put under your nose? Where they live? Their email address? Job / Work history? References?

That’s the most I’ll invest in reviewing a résumé, I tend to skim it, in fact, I rarely look at them. I would prefer you considered less time-consuming methods, give me a picture of who you think you are, and what others say you are. You can’t really do that in a résumé, because the résumé is skewed by the person submitting it.

The location or where a person lives may be important, if you need them in an office, and they live across the country, you either have to pay moving expenses, or find someone local. The email address, if its a Gmail, yahoo or any other kind of free service, that tends to be a negative, but not show stopper. I prefer to see applicants invest in owning their personal domain name, it shows commitment to me. Job / work history gives me some insight about whether they can do what I need done, it’s not that important because every job has a training cycle anyway. References are probably the most important part, but not the one’s the applicant sends me, I want objective views of a person. I don’t want to hear about how hard they work, I want insight as to what kind of person they are.

The résumé of the future will be and is, a more transparent view of the candidate.

If you must send me a resume, just email me your LinkedIn Profile, completed of course. And most importantly, you should have connected with me somewhere before, don’t just blindly send me your info without knowing if I’m looking, or knowing anything about what I do. Having said that, LinkedIn at least will give me some outside context, have they been recommended, when did those recommendations get posted, and by whom. Have the endorsements been tinkered with, most likely, it’s the easiest thing to game. After that, I’ll do my leg work, like skimming FaceBook, Google, and other Social Networks that may show character pro’s and con’s. I will invest my time in doing research online before I ever decide to interview someone face-to-face.

Personally, resume’s do not work well, there are some many ways for me to learn about a candidate, and more effective ways to get picked. I feel the same way about business cards, they too rarely get used, or produce the kind of results one hopes for. Even job banks are terrible, recruiting sites, and they’re digital failures in my humble opinion. The best way to solve this dilemma, once you’ve determined what work you want to do, figure out how to connect with the principle or HR person, and build a relationship be it online or off. Yes, it does take effort, but connecting with those who make the decisions, or influence the hiring, will get you closer to your desired result.

I may sound smug, even arrogant, if someone wants to know about me, I usually tell them to Google my name, that will direct them to my website, which is my personal domain name, and ton more about what I’ve been up to on and offline. The résumé isn’t dead, it’s different, it’s digital, and we must be creative about it, think differently, otherwise….you’ll be last at the food dish, and the last one rarely gets the gig.