owen at owengreaves dot com

Posts Tagged ‘GMail’

Is The Inbox No Longer Sacred?

Recently I wrote about privacy & security, I find it interesting that email is still considered open season. I can stop you from posting on my wall, and very little else. Consider how much time one can use to filter or manage the ongoing spam, email your friends think you should read, and then there’s the deluge of offers from Internet Marketers.

One not talked about often, is emails from those called acquaintances, or someone you met a wine & cheese that just can’t wait to get home to send you that all important ask, and they want you to work for free. I’m all for doing free, but that free is a calculated risk I take, not one I impose on others. Is the inbox no longer sacred? Having a conversation, or meeting someone at a social doesn’t mean you can make a request to work for free, to fill your inbox with offers, and to refer them and the their work to others.

The inbox violation is part of the etiquette of relationships, carving out time to get to know people at a deeper more rooted level. I’ll meet with almost anyone who asks, to be clear, if you’re asking me to work, don’t be surprised if I tell you jump through a hoop or two.

Be respectful of the Inbox, your business depends on it.

 

The Future Of Business – The Resume

Why are we still submitting resume’s? Why do we continue to use them? They’re not useful, not in the way they need to be, so why do we keep using a tool that doesn’t work very well? Most resume’s never see the light of day, in fact, the only time they get looked at, is if there is an immediate need. What’s the first thing you look at when you have a résumé put under your nose? Where they live? Their email address? Job / Work history? References?

That’s the most I’ll invest in reviewing a résumé, I tend to skim it, in fact, I rarely look at them. I would prefer you considered less time-consuming methods, give me a picture of who you think you are, and what others say you are. You can’t really do that in a résumé, because the résumé is skewed by the person submitting it.

The location or where a person lives may be important, if you need them in an office, and they live across the country, you either have to pay moving expenses, or find someone local. The email address, if its a Gmail, yahoo or any other kind of free service, that tends to be a negative, but not show stopper. I prefer to see applicants invest in owning their personal domain name, it shows commitment to me. Job / work history gives me some insight about whether they can do what I need done, it’s not that important because every job has a training cycle anyway. References are probably the most important part, but not the one’s the applicant sends me, I want objective views of a person. I don’t want to hear about how hard they work, I want insight as to what kind of person they are.

The résumé of the future will be and is, a more transparent view of the candidate.

If you must send me a resume, just email me your LinkedIn Profile, completed of course. And most importantly, you should have connected with me somewhere before, don’t just blindly send me your info without knowing if I’m looking, or knowing anything about what I do. Having said that, LinkedIn at least will give me some outside context, have they been recommended, when did those recommendations get posted, and by whom. Have the endorsements been tinkered with, most likely, it’s the easiest thing to game. After that, I’ll do my leg work, like skimming FaceBook, Google, and other Social Networks that may show character pro’s and con’s. I will invest my time in doing research online before I ever decide to interview someone face-to-face.

Personally, resume’s do not work well, there are some many ways for me to learn about a candidate, and more effective ways to get picked. I feel the same way about business cards, they too rarely get used, or produce the kind of results one hopes for. Even job banks are terrible, recruiting sites, and they’re digital failures in my humble opinion. The best way to solve this dilemma, once you’ve determined what work you want to do, figure out how to connect with the principle or HR person, and build a relationship be it online or off. Yes, it does take effort, but connecting with those who make the decisions, or influence the hiring, will get you closer to your desired result.

I may sound smug, even arrogant, if someone wants to know about me, I usually tell them to Google my name, that will direct them to my website, which is my personal domain name, and ton more about what I’ve been up to on and offline. The résumé isn’t dead, it’s different, it’s digital, and we must be creative about it, think differently, otherwise….you’ll be last at the food dish, and the last one rarely gets the gig.

The Future Of Business – Turn Your Business Into A Platform

This idea of platforms has been talked about for years now, new start-ups are popping up everywhere, many are trying to convert and become a useful platform. Why a platform? The business of the future needs to become a destination and useful, a place where people can come together and do something useful. People always return to things and places that are useful to them.

The best example of a platform to date is Google, they provide an environment where you can run your entire business. That in itself is very useful. Crisis mappers wasted no time responding: In under 2.5 hours Google launched its person finder application, which was also used when New Zealand’s 6.3 quake. A platform can be built upon and used, think of all the things you can do at Google, problems you can solve, and dare I say it, the time you can save. Today you can view your street via Google Maps, you can get images, videos, news, books, you can use Gmail for your primary email service, you can use Blogger to put your content on the NET, you can translate the language of a site. Google provides all these tools at no charge to you, an open & free business model to the extreme, it’s what the cloud is meant to be.

If you have a platform, you will need developers and other entrepreneurs to build on it, creating more functionality which brings more users. FaceBook did that. Networks are built upon platforms, the Internet is a platform, services like Flickr, WordPress, PayPal, self-publishing company LuLu.com, and business software Salesforce.com.

Google as I mentioned above is not just one platform but multiple platforms, multiple ways of using Google, multiple ways to build upon what Google has built and provides to you for free. What is a platform, platforms help users create products, businesses, communities, and networks of thier own. If it’s open and collaborative, those users may add value to platforms.

Questions to ask yourself: How can you or your business act as a platform? What can others build on top of it? How can you add value? How little value can you extract? How big can the network grow atop your platform? How can the platform get better learning from it’s users? How can you create an open standard so competitors will use and even contribute to the network and you get a share of thier value? It’s time to make your business a platform. It’s time to make your business mobile.

As you can see by the list of questions there is much to consider, pull together a team to begin the process of building you platform. If you are looking for help in creating ideas to adopt the future of business, stay here, I will be continually be posting concepts and ideas for you to build upon, or, just e-mail me.